Sorbic acid (sorbinezuur)

codes geen / geen

 

 

Formula

CAS

C6H8O2

110-44-1

 
CAS: Chemical Abstract Service Registry Number
 

Background

Sorbic acid is a preservative that functions as a mold and yeast inhibitor.

 

Synonyms

2,4-Hexadienoic acid
2-Propenyl acrylic acid
Preservastat
Sorbic acid
Sorbistat

 

Uses

Alkyd coatings
Adhesives
Cosmetics
Drying oils
Foods cheeses, wine, fruit, soda, baked goods
Glues
Inks
Medicaments topical steroids
Metalworking fulids
Mold and yeast inhibitor
Paints
Rubber
Varnishes

 

Cross-Reactions

Potassium sorbate

 

Unusual Reactions

Immunologic contact urticaria
Non-immunologic contact urticaria

 

References

 1.

Hannuksela, M., M. Kousa, and V. Pirila, Allergy to ingredients of vehicles. Contact Dermatitis, 1976. 2(2): p. 105-10.

 2.

Lahti, A., Skin reactions to some antimicrobial agents. Contact Dermatitis, 1978. 4(5): p. 302-3.

 3.

Rietschel, R.L., Contact urticaria from synthetic cassia oil and sorbic acid limited to the face. Contact Dermatitis, 1978. 4(6): p. 347-9.

 4.

Brown, R., Another case of sorbic acid sensitivity. Contact Dermatitis, 1979. 5(4): p. 268.

 5.

Coyle, H.E., E. Miller, and R.S. Chapman, Sorbic acid sensitivity from Unguentum Merck. Contact Dermatitis, 1981. 7(1): p. 56-7.

 6.

Goransson, K. and S. Liden, Contact allergy to sorbic acid and Unguentum Merck. Contact Dermatitis, 1981. 7(5): p. 277.

 7.

Clemmensen, O. and N. Hjorth, Perioral contact urticaria from sorbic acid and benzoic acid in a salad dressing. Contact Dermatitis, 1982. 8(1): p. 1-6.

 8.

Clemmensen, O.J. and M. Schiodt, Patch test reaction of the buccal mucosa to sorbic acid. Contact Dermatitis, 1982. 8(5): p. 341-2.

 9.

Fisher, A.A., Allergic reactions to contact lens solutions. Cutis, 1985. 36(3): p. 209-11.

10.

Gollhausen, R. and A.M. Kligman, Human assay for identifying substances which induce non-allergic contact urticaria: the NICU-test. Contact Dermatitis, 1985. 13(2): p. 98-106.

11.

Lahti, A. and H.I. Maibach, Species specificity of nonimmunologic contact urticaria: guinea pig, rat, and mouse. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 1985. 13(1): p. 66-9.

12.

Lamey, P.J., A.B. Lamb, and A. Forsyth, Atypical burning mouth syndrome. Contact Dermatitis, 1987. 17(4): p. 242-3.

13.

Haustein, U.F., Burning mouth syndrome due to nicotinic acid esters and sorbic acid. Contact Dermatitis, 1988. 19(3): p. 225-6.

14.

Safford, R.J., et al., Immediate contact reactions to chemicals in the fragrance mix and a study of the quenching action of eugenol. British Journal of Dermatology, 1990. 123(5): p. 595-606.

15.

Ramsing, D.W. and T. Menne, Contact sensitivity to sorbic acid. Contact Dermatitis, 1993. 28(2): p. 124-5.

 

 

 

 

 

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