Wool alcohols (Lanolin)

codes geen / geen

 

 

Formula

CAS

 

 

 
CAS: Chemical Abstract Service Registry Number
 

Background

Wool is a natural protein fiber consisting mainly of protein, an  oily, waxy external lipid fraction and a minor internal lipid content.
hydrolysis of the external lipids result in a complex mixture of esters of alochols and fatty acids of which wool alcohols (lanolin) are the main allergen. Other alcohols like stearylalcohol, cetylalcohol and oleylalcohol, may less frequently cause contact allergies. The composition of lanolin varies based on time and place of manufacture. The sebum of sheep constitutes 5% to 25% of the weight of sheared raw wool.
Lanolin is used in cosmetic and pharmacologic preparations because of its emollient, moisturizing, and emulsifying properties. Numerous chemical modifications of lanolin are used to improve its attributes and eliminate particular disadvantages.
Because lanolin is a complex natural product, the allergens have not been definitively delineated. The wide variety and purity of lanolin make complete identification of its components virtually impossible. Lanolin-sensitive patients can sometimes tolerate one lanolin preparation but not another.
Lanolin allergy is most common among leg ulcer patients.

 

Synonyms

Anhydrous lanolin
Wool fat
Wool wax
Wool grease
Wool alcohol
Clearlin
Glossylan
Golden Dawn
Hychol
Nodorian
Sparklelan
Adeps lanae anhydrous
Aloholes lanae

Names for Modified Lanolin
Lanolin acid
Amerlate
Argowax
Facilan
Lanolic acids
Ritalafa
Skliro
Lanolin alcohol
Argo wax
Fancol LA
Hartolan
Lanalol
Nimco
Rita wax
Lanolin oil
Argonol
Fluilan
Lanalene
Lanogene
Lanoil
Lantrol
Lipolan
Ritalan
Vigilan
Lanolin wax
Albalan
Lanalene wax
Lanfrax
Lanocerin
Lanowax

 

 

Uses

Cosmetics- creams, lotions, ointments, etc.
Cutting oil emulsions
Furniture polish
Furs
Inks
Leather
Metal corrosion prevention
Paper
Textiles
Topical medications
Waxes

 

Cross-Reactions

Lanette wax

 

Unusual Reactions

 

 

References

1.

Fisher, A.A., F. Pascher, and N.B. Kanof, Allergic contact dermatitis due to ingredients of vehicles. A "vehicle tray" for patch testing. Archives of Dermatology, 1971. 104(3): p. 286-90.

2.

Breit, R. and H.J. Bandmann, Contact dermatitis XXII. Dermatitis from lanolin. British Journal of Dermatology, 1973. 88(4): p. 414-6.

3.

Hannuksela, M., M. Kousa, and V. Pirila, Contact sensitivity to emulsifiers. Contact Dermatitis, 1976. 2(4): p. 201-4.

4.

Hannuksela, M., M. Kousa, and V. Pirila, Allergy to ingredients of vehicles. Contact Dermatitis, 1976. 2(2): p. 105-10.

5.

Clark, E.W., E. Cronin, and D.S. Wilkinson, Lanolin with reduced sensitizing potential. A preliminary note. Contact Dermatitis, 1977. 3(2): p. 69-74.

6.

Husain, S.L., Contact dermatitis in the West of Scotland. Contact Dermatitis, 1977. 3(6): p. 327-32.

7.

Blondeel, A., J. Oleffe, and G. Achten, Contact allergy in 330 dermatological patients. Contact Dermatitis, 1978. 4(5): p. 270-6.

8.

Foussereau, J., Allergy to turpentine, lanolin and nickel in Strasbourg. Contact Dermatitis, 1978. 4(5): p. 300.

9.

Hambly, E.M., L. Levia, and D.S. Wilkinson, Wool intolerance in atopic subjects. Contact Dermatitis, 1978. 4(4): p. 240-1.

10.

Oleffe, J.A., A. Blondeel, and S. Boschmans, Patch testing with lanolin. Contact Dermatitis, 1978. 4(4): p. 233-47.

11.

Calnan, C.D., Lanolin in protective metal coatings. Contact Dermatitis, 1979. 5(4): p. 267-8.

12.

Camarasa, J.M., First epidemiological study of contact dermatitis in Spain - 1977. Spanish Contact Dermatitis Research Group. Acta Dermato-Venereologica. Supplementum, 1979. 59(85): p. 33-7.

13.

Fraki, J.E., L. Peltonen, and V.K. Hopsu-Havu, Allergy to various components of topical preparations in stasis dermatitis and leg ulcer. Contact Dermatitis, 1979. 5(2): p. 97-100.

14.

Mortensen, T., Allergy to lanolin. Contact Dermatitis, 1979. 5(3): p. 137-9.

15.

Schlossman, M.L. and J.P. McCarthy, Lanolin and derivatives chemistry: relationship to allergic contact dermatitis. Contact Dermatitis, 1979. 5(2): p. 65-72.

16.

Hammershoy, O., Standard patch test results in 3,225 consecutive Danish patient from 1973 to 1977. Contact Dermatitis, 1980. 6(4): p. 263-8.

17.

Wilkinson, J.D., E.M. Hambly, and D.S. Wilkinson, Comparison of patch test results in two adjacent areas of England. II. Medicaments. Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 1980. 60(3): p. 245-9.

18.

Clark, E.W., et al., Lanolin of reduced sensitizing potential. Contact Dermatitis, 1981. 7(2): p. 80-3.

19.

Cronin, E., Lanolin labelling of cosmetics. Contact Dermatitis, 1981. 7(1): p. 53.

20.

Agarwal, K., Contact allergic purpura to wool dust. Contact Dermatitis, 1982. 8(4): p. 281-2.

21.

Giorgini, S., M.C. Melli, and A. Sertoli, Comments on the allergenic activity of lanolin. Contact Dermatitis, 1983. 9(5): p. 425-6.

22.

Kligman, A.M., Lanolin allergy: crisis or comedy. Contact Dermatitis, 1983. 9(2): p. 99-107.

23.

van Ketel, W.G. and J. Wemer, Allergy to lanolin and "lanolin-free" creams. Contact Dermatitis, 1983. 9(5): p. 420.

24.

Daly, B.M. and C.J. Stevenson, Contact dermatitis to wood wool. Contact Dermatitis, 1984. 11(2): p. 123.

25.

Fisher, A.A., Purpuric contact dermatitis. Cutis, 1984. 33(4): p. 346, 349, 351.

26.

Fregert, S., I. Dahlquist, and L. Trulsson, An attempt to isolate and identify allergens in lanolin. Contact Dermatitis, 1984. 10(1): p. 16-9.

27.

Shmunes, E. and J. Keil, The role of atopy in occupational dermatoses. Contact Dermatitis, 1984. 11(3): p. 174-8.

28.

Edman, B., Sites of contact dermatitis in relationship to particular allergens. Contact Dermatitis, 1985. 13(3): p. 129-35.

29.

Rademaker, M., J.D. Kirby, and I.R. White, Contact cheilitis to shellac, Lanpol 5 and colophony. Contact Dermatitis, 1986. 15(5): p. 307-8.

30.

Bendsoe, N., A. Bjornberg, and H. Asnes, Itching from wool fibres in atopic dermatitis. Contact Dermatitis, 1987. 17(1): p. 21-2.

31.

de Groot, A.C., et al., The role of contact allergy in the spectrum of adverse effects caused by cosmetics and toiletries. Contact Dermatitis, 1988. 19(3): p. 195-201.

32.

Edman, B., The usefulness of detailed information to patients with contact allergy. Contact Dermatitis, 1988. 19(1): p. 43-7.

33.

Gollhausen, R., et al., Trends in allergic contact sensitization. Contact Dermatitis, 1988. 18(3): p. 147-54.

34.

Edman, B. and H. Moller, Testing a purified lanolin preparation by a randomized procedure. Contact Dermatitis, 1989. 20(4): p. 287-90.

35.

Lachapelle, J.M., A left versus right side comparative study of Epiquick patch test results in 100 consecutive patients. Contact Dermatitis, 1989. 20(1): p. 51-6.

36.

Marston, S., Contact dermatitis from cetostearyl alcohol in hydrocortisone butyrate lipocream, and from lanolin. Contact Dermatitis, 1991. 24(5): p. 372.

37.

Kristensen, O., A prospective study of the development of hand eczema in an automobile manufacturing industry. Contact Dermatitis, 1992. 26(5): p. 341-5.

38.

Lever, R. and A. Forsyth, Allergic contact dermatitis in atopic dermatitis. Acta Dermato-Venereologica. Supplementum, 1992. 176: p. 95-98.

39.

Quirce, S., et al., Occupational dermatitis in a ewe milker. Contact Dermatitis, 1992. 27(1): p. 56.

40.

O'Donnell, B.F. and C. Hodgson, Allergic contact dermatitis due to lanolin in an adhesive plaster. Contact Dermatitis, 1993. 28(3): p. 191-2.

41.

Pasche-Koo, F., et al., High sensitization rate to emulsifiers in patients with chronic leg ulcers. Contact Dermatitis, 1994. 31(4): p. 226-8.

42.

Stam-Westerveld, E.B., et al., Rubbing test responses of the skin to man-made mineral fibres of different diameters. Contact Dermatitis, 1994. 31(1): p. 1-4.

43.

Henderson, C.A., A.S. Highet, and H.K. Shamy, The frequency of lanolin contact allergy. Contact Dermatitis, 1995. 32(1): p. 52.

44.

Kligman AM. The myth of lanolin allergy. Contact Dermatitis 1998;39:103-7

 

 

 

 

 

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